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Posts Tagged ‘ir algorithms’

PostHeaderIcon Google's Orion and Vincent

Well, even as I really want to write about Twitter and the English language, along comes Google with a new update.  Given the nature of social media, timeliness comes before etymological Godliness (when will you ever see those two words combined in a blog… I think I deserve an award for that one).  Therefore like any young techie in Spring, I turn my thoghtes (thank you Mr. Chaucer) and my feet towards a pilgrimage to the Googleplex. 

But of course, I don’t want to ignore the previous Vincent update – as that was the connection to post #1.

Orion first.  Actually Google did not announce “Orion” – which is a search technology it purchased in 2006, along with it’s college-student developer Ori Allon.  But my guess is that thanks to Greg Sterling’s new article containing that title the term “Orion Release” will stick.  Here’s how Danny Sullivan described the technology back in April 2006:

It sounds like Allon mainly developed an algorithm useful in pulling out better summaries of web pages. In other words, if you did a search, you’d be likely to get back extracted sections of pages most relevant to your query.

Ori himself wrote the following in his press release:

Orion finds pages where the content is about a topic strongly related to the key word. It then returns a section of the page, and lists other topics related to the key word so the user can pick the most relevant.

Google actually announced two changes:

Longer Snippets.  When users input queries of more than three words,  the Google results will now contain more lines of text in order to provide more information and context.   As a reminder, a snippet is a search result that starts with a dark blue title and is followed by a few lines of text.  Google’s research must have shown that regular-length snippets were not providing enough information to searchers to provide a clear preference for a result based on their longer search term – as their stated intent is to provide enhanced information that will improve the searcher’s ability to determine the relevance of items listed in the SERPs.

Having said this, I don’t see any difference.  My slav…. I mean my 12-yo son (who has been doing keyword analysis since he was 10, so no slouch at this) ran ten tests on Google to see if we could find a difference (I won’t detail all the one- and two- vs 3+ word combinations we tried – if you want to have the list, leave a comment or send a twitter to arthurofsun and I will forward it to you).  But shown below are the results for France Travel vs France Travel Guides for Northern France:

 Comparison of Two-Word and 3+ Word Search in Google Orion Release

Comparison of Two-Word and 3+ Word Search in Google Orion Release

 

As you can see, there is absolutely no difference in snippet length for the two searches - and this was universally true across all the searches we ran.    So I’m not sure – I wonder if Ori Allon, who wrote the post, could help us out on this one.

Also, I am somewhat confused.  If you type in more keywords, the search engine has more information by which to determine the relevance of  a result.  So why would I need more information?  Where I need more information is in the situation of a 3- keyword search, which will return a broad set of results that I will need to filter based on the information contained in a longer snippet.

Enhanced Search Associations.  The bigger enhancement – and the one that seems most likely to derive from the original Orion technology – are enhanced associations between keywords.  Basically if you type in a keyword – Ori uses the example  ”principles of physics” – then the new algorithms understand that there are other ideas related to this I may be interested in, like “Big Bang” or “Special Relativity.”  The way Google has implemented this is to put a set of related keywords at the bottom of the first SERP, which you may click on.  When you click, it returns a new set of search results based on the keyword you clicked.  Why at the bottom of the first SERP?  My hypothesis would be that if the searcher has gone to the bottom of the page, it means that they haven’t found what they are looking for.  So this is the right place in the user experience to prompt them with related keywords that they may find more relevant to the content they are seeking. 

From my perspective, this feels like the “People who liked this item also bought…” widget on most comparison shopping sites (which I know something about, having been the head of marketing for SHOP.COM.)  I’m not saying there is anything wrong with this – I’m just trying to make an analogy to the type of user experience Google is trying to create.

Shown below is an example of a enhanced search associations from a search on the broad term “credit derivatives in the USA”:

End of First SERP Showing Google's New Enhanced Association Results

End of First SERP Showing Google's New Enhanced Association Results

 As I expected, the term “credit default swaps” – which is the major form of credit derivative – shows as an associated keyword.  What I do not see in the list – and was surprised  – was any reference to the International Swaps and Derivatives Association (ISDA), which is the organization that has developed the standards and rules by which most derivatives are created.  It does, however, show up for the search on the keyword “credit default swap.”  I’d be curious to understand just exactly how the algorithm has been tuned to make trade-offs between broad concepts (i.e, credit derivatives, which is a category)) and very focused concepts (i.e. credit default swap, which is a specific product).  Maybe I can get Ori to opine on that as well, but most likely that comes under the category of secret sauce.

Anyway, fascinating and it certainly shows that Google continues to evolve the state of IR. 

Well, I’ll just have to leave the Vincent release until tomorrow.  Something else happened this morning I need to do a quick entry about.  Sigh…..

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