About Online Matters

PostHeaderIcon Technical SEO: Site Loading Times and SEO Rankings Part 2

In my last post, I discussed the underlying issues regarding site loading times and SEO rankings.  What I tried to do was help the reader understand why site loading times are important from the perspective of someone designing a search engine that has to crawl billions of pages.  The post also outlines a few of the structures that they would have to put in place to accurately and effectively crawl all the pages they need in a limited time with limited processing power.  I also tried to show that a search engine like Google has a political and economic agenda in ensuring fast sites, not just a technical agenda.  Google wants as many people/eyeballs on the web as possible, so it is to their advantage to ensure that web sites provide a good user experience.  As a result, they feel quite justified in penalizing sites that do not have good speed/performance characteristics.

As you would expect, the conclusion is that if your site is hugely slow you will not get indexed and will not rank in the SERPs.  What is “hugely slow”?  Google has indicated that slow is a relative notion and is determined based on the loading times typical of sites in your geographical region.  Having said that, relative or not, from an SEO perspective I wouldn’t want to have a site where pages are taking more than 10 seconds on average to load. YEAH! Local, the SEO powerhouse, has found from sites they have tested that average load times higher than approximately 10 seconds to completely load a page will have a significant impact on being indexed.  From a UE perspective, there is some interesting data that the limit on visitors patience is about 6-8 secondsGoogle has studied this data, so it would probably prefer to set its threshhold in that region.  But I doubt it can.   Many small sites are not that sophisticated, do not know these kinds of rules, and do not know how to check or evaluate their site loading times.  Besides this, there are often problems with hosts that cause servers to run slowly at times.  Google has to take that into account, as well.  So I believe that the timeout has to be substantially higher than 6-8 seconds, but 10 seconds as a crawl limit is a guess, 

I have yet to see a definitive statement by anyone as to what the absolute limit is for site speed before indexing ceases altogether (if you have a reference, please post it in the comments).  I’m sure that if a bot comes to a first page and it exceeds the bot’s timeout threshold in the algorithm, your site won’t get spidered at all.  But once the bot gets by the first page, it has to do an on-going computation of average page loading times for the site to determine if the average exceeds the built-in threshold, so at least a few pages would have to be crawled in that case. 

Now here’s where it gets interesting.  What happens between fast (let’s say < 1-2 second loading times, although this is actually pretty slow but a number Matt Cutts in the video below indicates is ok) and the timeout limit?  And how important is site speed as a ranking signal?  Let’s answer one question at a time.

When a site is slow but not slow enough to hit any built-in timeout limits (not tied to the number of pages), a couple of things can happen.   We do know that Google allocates bot time by the number of pages on the site and the number of pages it has to index/re-index.  So for a small site that performs poorly, it is likely that most of the pages will get indexed.  Likely, but not a guarantee.  It all depends on the cumulative time lag versus the average that a site creates. If a site is large, then you can almost guarantee that some pages will not be indexed, as the cumulative time lag will ultimately hit the threshold set by the bots for a site of that number of pages. By definition, some of your content will not get ranked and you will not get the benefit of that content in your rankings.

As an aside, by the way, there has been a lot of confusion around the <meta name=”revisit-after”> tag.  The revisit-after meta tag takes this form <meta name=”revisit-after” content=”5 days”>.
This tag supposedly tells the bots how often to come back to the site to reindex this specific page (in this case 5 days).  The idea is that you can improve the crawlability of your site by telling the bots not to index certain pages all the time, but only some of the time.  I became aware of this tag at SMX East, when one of the “authorities” on SEO mentioned it as usable for this purpose.  The trouble is that, from everything I have read, the tag is completely unsupported by any of the major engines, and was only supported by one tiny search engine (SearchBC)  many years ago. 

But let’s say you are one of the lucky sites where the site runs slowly but all the pages do get indexed.  Do Google or any of the other major search engines use the site’s performance as a ranking signal?  In other words, all my pages are in the index.  So you would expect that they would be ranked based on the quality of their content and their authority derived from inbound links, site visits, time-on-site, and other typical ranking signals.  Performance is not a likely candidate for a ranking signal and isn’t important. 

If you thought that, then you were wrong. Historically, Google has said, and Matt Cutts reiterates this in the video below, that site load times do not influence search rankings.  But while that may be true now, it may not be in the near future.  And this is where Maile’s comments took me by surprise.  In a small group session at SMX East 2009, Maile was asked about site performance and rankings.  She indicated that for the “middle ground” sites that are indexing but loading slowly, site performance may already be used to influence rankings.  Who is right, I can’t say.  These are both highly respected professionals who choose their words carefully. 

 

Whatever is true, Google is sending us signals that this change is coming.  Senior experts like Matt and Maile don’t say these things lightly.  They are well considered and probably approved positions that they are asked to take.  This is Google’s way of preventing us from getting mad when the change occurs.  Google has the fallback of saying “we warned you this could happen.”  Which from today’s viewpoiint means it will happen.

Conclusion: Start working on your site performance now, as it will be important for SEO rankings later. 

Oh and, by the way, your user experience will just happen to be better, which is clearly the real reason to fix site performance. 

And it isn’t only Google that may make this change.  Engineers from Yahoo! recently filed a patent with the title “Web Document User Experience Characterization Methods and Systems” which bears on this topic.  Let me quote paragraph 21:

With so many websites and web pages being available and with varying hardware and software configurations, it may be beneficial to identify which web documents may lead to a desired user experience and which may not lead to a desired user experience. By way of example but not limitation, in certain situations it may be beneficial to determine (e.g., classify, rank, characterize) which web documents may not meet performance or other user experience expectations if selected by the user. Such performance may, for example, be affected by server, network, client, file, and/or like processes and/or the software, firmware, and/or hardware resources associated therewith. Once web documents are identified in this manner the resulting user experience information may, for example, be considered when generating the search results.

In does not appear Yahoo! has implemented any aspect of this patent yet, and who knows what the Bing agreement will mean for site performance and search.  But clearly this is a “problem” that the search engine muftis have set their eyes on and I would expect that if Google does implement it, others will follow.

Share

3 Responses to “Technical SEO: Site Loading Times and SEO Rankings Part 2”

  • Link Building Services Guy says:

    Your blog looks nice, however it would be better if you can use lighter set of colors as well as a professional design. This will ensure that a lot more readers come to check it out.

    Informative post by the way!

  • Thank you. Why will lighter colors help in the design? And what about the layout don’t you like?

  • Kevin says:

    Hi, Sir,
    Thank you for your helpful information on the website loading time.
    Indeed, the loading time of website is very important now for both user-friendly aspect and Google PR value.
    I have been endeavoring in SEO on my website recently, so as to promote my business of oil paintings. I would appreciate very much if you can provide some suggestion for me to improve the loading time of my website.
    Thank you & Best regards,
    Kevin from China.

Posts By Date
November 2009
M T W T F S S
« Oct   Dec »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30